Making Everyday Beautiful

 
 

For Christmas I was fortunate enough to receive the much hyped Dyson hairdryer. Since receiving it I’ve had a multitude of reactions from family, friends and colleague’s, at their discovery of me receiving such a gift. The most common one being ‘doesn’t that cost £300?!’. The short answer to that question is yes; yes it does (gulp). I immediately spring to it’s defence and interject ‘yeah but it makes me smile!’. You can feel an eerie silence of confusion and they seem to follow up with ‘Is it actually any good?’.

I put it on my Christmas list not only for the seductive and slightly playful piece of product design it really is, but for the significance a hairdryer has in my daily life. It is a product that I’m using for about 10 minutes every single day, that accumulates to around 61 hours a year! For something that is such an essential tool in my everyday life I ‘need’ it to be the best version it can possibly be, meaning I took the plunge and added the Dyson to my Christmas list. On the whole the Dyson is lighter, quieter, extra precise and a heck of a lot more elegant than your average hairdryer.

 
 

Recently I watched a TED talk by Tony Fadell titled ‘The first secret of design is … noticing’. He talks about a way in which we as humans learn, it’s called habituation. Sometimes it can be incredibly helpful in learning new skills quickly. Other times it can work against us, and we won’t notice things that need improving in our everyday lives. I have somewhat adapted this idea into a philosophy for buying new products.

This is me noticing my regular hairdryer and saying ‘you aren't good enough to be spending that amount of time in my life’. I have a similar method of justifying new gadgets to myself, I describe them as ‘tools for creation’, I’m sure we’ll get to that when I treat myself to a drone.

As to whether this is my justification of desiring overly expensive everyday objects or I have a point, is your choice. But what I can be sure of is that it’s a pleasure to use!

Until next time, Alex